march thirty one: writer’s digest, chapbook poetry challenge, prompt #6

Writer Wordart

Writer Wordart (Photo credit: MarkGregory007)

Here is my attempt to continue to play catch up with the Chapbook Poetry Challenge from Writer’s Digest. The challenge is up to Day 11. I’m still on Day 6. Wish me luck.

For the month of November, the challenge is to write apoem-a-day andsubmit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides written by Robert Lee Brewer onWriter’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

 

Prompt #6 comes from Walt Wojtanik. It’s a Two-for-Tuesday prompt) which is actually two prompts (it just happened to be Election Day):

  1. Write a Left Poem.
  2. Write a Right Poem.

MY POEM(s):

#1

I know my Rights!

I have to be right all of the time

even when I know I’m wrong

even when I know I’m lost the battle

to get my point across.

Even when I’ve beat you over the head

with my point

to view

my way

through my eyes

through my

somewhat squewed

perspective

I have to be right all of the time

because if I don’t

think I’m right

Who will?

 

#2

GPS Haiku

What if I turn left?

Who will help me go right?

Find your direction

 

c) Kellea Tibbs and march thirty one, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of original march thirty one material without express and written permission from the author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. 

march thirty one: writers digest chapbook poetry challenge, prompt #5

Student texting during class

Student texting during class (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For the month of November, the challenge is to write apoem-a-day andsubmit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides written by Robert Lee Brewer onWriter’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

Prompt #5 from Amanda Lauftland: Write a text message poem. Compose a poem in several short sections inspired by the compression of text messages. The poem might have one speaker or many speakers.

I love this challenge. There are so many things about text messages that can be turned into poetry.

Poem #1:  celebrity text haiku

celebrities die

we send a text to update

do the same for life

Poem #2:  texting while meeting

its become

common practice

to keep phones on tables

during meetings

no longer

deemed as rude

we treat every moment as urgent

so that we can’t even

sit through meetings

or other routines of our day

without checking for messages

so that just in case we miss something

we can’t use the excuse

that “I was in a meeting”

 

Poem #3:  Bill Collector Text

“this is a friendly reminder that your bill is past due”

“I don’t have a payment for you this month – other unexpected expenses”

“we will need a payment today”

“well, do what you have to do – today is not happening”

c) Kellea Tibbs and march thirty one, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of original march thirty one material without express and written permission from the author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. 

march thirty one: writers digest chapbook poetry challenge, prompt #4

English: Skin color distribution around the wo...

English: Skin color distribution around the world, data for native populations collected by R. Biasutti prior to 1940 Italiano: Distribuzione del colore della pelle di tutto il mondo, i dati raccolti per le popolazioni native di R. Biasutti prima del 1940 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For the month of November, the challenge is to write apoem-a-day andsubmit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides written by Robert Lee Brewer on Writer’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

Prompt #4 from Marie Ellen Good:  Take the phrase “Just Beneath (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write the poem.  Possible titles include “Just Beneath My Feet,” “Just Beneath This City,” or “Just Beneath the Surface.”

MY POEM:

Just Beneath My Skin

just beneath my skin

what you can’t see

is my heart

blood pumping through my veins

giving me life

my bones

holding up my frame

guiding me through

the hustle and bustle

of busy schedules

what you don’t see

is the intellect

underneath my skin tone

beyond my hue

the dark skin

that doesn’t allow you to

see the human

the woman

the citizen

who wants

the opportunities from life

that historians have defined as

life, liberty, and happiness

but because

scienc doesn’t allow you

to see underneath my skin

you only see what’s at sea level

somehow society that allows you to

assign derogatory names

to people you don’t know

for whom you’ve willingly overturned

years of civil rights

violated biblical courtesies

so that in the name of God

you have been allowed to treat me

like  the slave

that in your mind

was never allowed to be free

and in your mind

Lincoln never signed that declaration

giving me

the same assignment  as you

to call America home

yet, underneath my skin

you will never know

what it feels like

to be treated

as second class

not even the mail

gets demoted like this

 

c) Kellea Tibbs and march thirty one, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of original march thirty one material without express and written permission from the author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. 

march thirty one: writer’s digest chapbook poetry challenge, prompt #3

Cover of "Poltergeist (25th Anniversary E...

Cover of Poltergeist (25th Anniversary Edition)

For the month of November, the challenge is to write apoem-a-day andsubmit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides written by Robert Lee Brewer on Writer’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

 

Prompt #3 is from Joshua Gray:  Write a poem that scares you. It could be a scary movie or ghost story poem. It could be a poem about a secret in your past. It could be a poem about your worst fear. It just needs to bring up a scary/fearful/uncomfortable emotion as you write.

 

MY POEM:

scary moments

last week

I watched Poltergeist on Halloween

that classic scary movie

from the 80s

with the pre-paranormal-esque

somewhat believable

story line

about houses built

on top of the graves

of long lost relatives

who returned to haunt the present

the shady real estate brokers

and the revenge of the underdog

a throwback of memories

considering the recession

houses in foreclosure

families in disarray

estate sales

and somehow trendsetters

manage to make downsizing

to apartment living

chic and cool again

scary movies

morphing into real life

make zombies and serial killers

look like kindergarten

c) Kellea Tibbs and march thirty one, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of original march thirty one material without express and written permission from the author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. 

march thirty one: writer’s digest chapbook poetry challenge, prompt #2

English: The Atlantic Ocean.

English: The Atlantic Ocean. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For the month of November, the challenge is to write a poem-a-day andsubmit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides written by Robert Lee Brewer on Writer’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

In my effort to continue to get caught up on the Chapbook Challenge, here is Prompt #2 from Khara House

Write a full moon poem. The full moon might be a character or symbol in the poem. Or the poem might address what happens during a full moon: magic, mischief, madness, etc.

 

MY POEM:

moon landing

for all you old heads

debbie harry sang about the tide

being high

before she decided to move on

but what about when a hurricane

barreling down the street

knocking on your door

causing life to come to a standstill

so that you can’t move on?

who’s responsible

for pleading your case

to the man in the moon

to keep the tide

from getting too high?

usually we like it when

the sun, the moon, and the stars

are aligned in our favor

but when they’re

aligned for disaster

who will manage the clean up

of the hearts, the souls, and the lives

that have become debris

along the Atlantic?

c) Kellea Tibbs and march thirty one, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of original march thirty one material without express and written permission from the author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. 

march thirty one: november poetry chapbook challenge from writer’s digest, prompt #1

William Faulkner's Underwood Universal Portabl...

William Faulkner’s Underwood Universal Portable sits in his office at Rowan Oak, which is now maintained by the University of Mississippi in Oxford as a museum. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I recently started following Writer’s Digest‘s Poetic Asides editor, Robert Lee Brewer.  For the month of November, the challenge is to write a poem-a-day and submit your finished work for a Chapbook Challenge. I’m getting a late start (10 days in) but I’ve decided that since I haven’t written any poetry since National Poetry Month with the NaPoWriMo Challenge (www.napowrimo.net), I thought November is as good a time as any to write new poetry. So here goes.

Find out the daily Chapbook Challenge prompts by visiting Poetic Asides on Writer’s Digest at:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/2012-november-pad-chapbook-challenge

Prompt #1 is from Moriya Koleva

Mariya’s Prompt: Write a matches poem. The matches could be sticks that make fire. Or it could be matches from a game. Or the verb of “to match.” Or as in the phrase “He’s not a good match for you.” Or whatever other match you can make.

My poem:

prom date

When I went to prom

we wore matching outfits

purple and gold lace

my first bustier

you wore a matching cumberbund

and bowtie

too bad

our futures didn’t go together

no high school sweetheart for me